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Sunday, August 9, 2020 | History

3 edition of Income distribution and tax, and government social spending policies in developing countries found in the catalog.

Income distribution and tax, and government social spending policies in developing countries

by Ke-young Chu

  • 263 Want to read
  • 7 Currently reading

Published by United Nations University, World Institute for Development Economics Research in Helsinki .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Income distribution -- Developing countries.,
  • Income maintenance programs -- Developing countries,
  • Government spending policy -- Developing countries.,
  • Expenditures, Public -- Developing countries.,
  • Education -- Developing countries -- Finance.,
  • Medical care -- Developing countries -- Finance.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementKe-young Chu, Hamid Davoodi, and Sanjeev Gupta.
    SeriesWIDER working papers -- no.214
    ContributionsDavoodi, Hamid Reza., Gupta, Sanjeev., World Institute for Development Economics Research.
    The Physical Object
    Paginationv, 49 p. ;
    Number of Pages49
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL20154365M
    ISBN 109524551187

    • In most developing countries, the public sector plays a leading role in the provision of public goods, via social spending. • Government intervention in the social sectors is justified on the grounds of positive externalities and market failures (Baldacci et al. ). • Yet, the question of whether government social spending is. The volume analyzes the revenue and spending of governments across eight low and middle-income countries - Armenia, Ethiopia, Georgia, Indonesia, Jordan, the Russian Federation, South Africa, and Sri Lanka – and can be viewed as a companion piece to The Redistributive Impact of Taxes and Social Spending in Latin America. As in the latter, this new report finds that taxes and transfers reduce.

    Where income is concentrated at the top of the distribution, property taxes will reduce post-tax income inequality. Income distribution in many developing countries has worsened since the s, though less so than in the US and UK, among other advanced economies.   “There is no clear net GDP cost of high tax-based social spending on GDP,” economist Peter H. Lindert concluded after surveying the long-run evidence from OECD countries in .

    This book focuses on the distributional consequences of the public sector and examines and documents, theoretically and empirically, the effects of government spending and taxation on personal distribution, and includes chapters investigating the relationship between the public sector and functional distribution of national income.   The US actually isn't especially unequal if you look at income before taxes or government transfers of progressive tax policies, the countries that do the most to social spending.


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Income distribution and tax, and government social spending policies in developing countries by Ke-young Chu Download PDF EPUB FB2

This paper reviews income distribution in developing (and transition) countries in recent decades. On average, before-tax income distribution in developing countries is less unequal than in industrial countries.

However, unlike industrial countries, developing countries in general have not been able to use tax and transfer policies effectively to reduce income inequality.

During the Cited by: Title: Income Distribution and Tax and Government Social Spending Policies in D eveloping Countries - WP/00/62 Created Date: 4/9/ AM. Davoodi, Hamid R.

and Gupta, Sanjeev and Chu, Ke-young, Income Distribution and Tax and Government Social Spending Policies in Developing Countries (March ). IMF Working Paper, Vol., pp. Cited by: Income Distribution and Tax and Government Social Spending Policies in Developing Countries Article (PDF Available) April with Reads How we measure 'reads'.

This paper reviews income distribution in developing (and transition) countries in recent decades. On average, before-tax income distribution is less unequal in developing countries than it is in industrial countries. However, unlike industrial countries, developing countries in general have not been able to use tax and transfer policies effectively to reduce income inequality.

During the. Chu, Ke-Young & Davoodi, Hamid & Gupta, Sanjeev, "Income Distribution and Tax, and Government Social Spending Policies in Developing Countries," WIDER Working PapersUnited Nations University, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).Handle: RePEc:ags:widerw DOI: / This paper reviews income distribution in developing countries in recent decades.

On average, before-tax income distribution is less unequal in developing countries than it is in industrial countries. However, unlike industrial countries, developing countries in general have not been able to use tax transfer policies effectively Income distribution and tax reduce income inequality.

Income Distribution and Tax, and Government Social Spending Policies in Developing Countries Chu, Ke-Young, Davoodi, Hamid and Gupta, Sanjeev (). UNU-WIDER. Income distribution and Tax and Government Social Spending Policies in Developing Countries Sanjeev Gupta Fiscal Affairs Department International Monetary Fund – A free PowerPoint PPT presentation (displayed as a Flash slide show) on - id: eZDI5N.

The government health care and primary and secondary education programs in developing countries are not well targeted, but their incidence tends to be distribution;Government expenditures;Developing countries;household income, direct taxes, indirect taxes, tax incidence, tax system, tax reform, benefit incidence, tax income.

Get this from a library. Income Distribution and Tax and Government Social Spending Policies in Developing Countries. [Ke-young Chu; Sanjeev Gupta; Hamid Reza Davoodi; International Monetary Fund.] -- This paper reviews income distribution in developing (and transition) countries in recent decades.

On average, before-tax income distribution in developing countries is less unequal than. Income inequality is one of the issue which is most discussed and struggled for its solution throughout the history of economics.

Since the s, income inequality has increased in most of the OECD (The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development) countries as in the whole world. Government social spending is one of the most important means of directly regulating income. Chu, Ke-young et al. (December ). Income distribution and tax and government social spending policies in developing countries.

UNU World Institute for Development Economic Research Working Paper No. Total net social spending. Total net social spending takes into account public and private social expenditure, and also includes the effect of direct taxes (income tax and social security contributions), indirect taxation of consumption on cash benefits, as well as tax breaks for social purposes.

Some studies found no evidence of a statistically significant relationship between government spending on health and education and the share of the poorest 20% of households in national income (e.g., Dollar et al. (), 5), while others found evidence that certain types of government spending, for example, on social welfare, education and.

Provides an overview of the changes in income distribution in developing and transition countries in recent decades, and assesses the incidence of taxes and government expenditure in these countries.

For the overview of income distribution, the chapter relies largely on a set of newly available ‘high‐quality’ income‐distribution data. in both developed and developing countries. Our current knowledge of how taxes, transfers reductions in government spending in social programs ) or have claimed a general ineffectiveness of tax policy to affect income distribution (Harberger, ).

total government spending in many developing countries, but which often disproportionately benefits higher income groups (Rhee et al ).

It has also been argued that government spending on health and education reduces income inequality, by producing a more equal distribution of human capital. The Fiscal Monitor focuses on three policy debates: progressive taxation, universal basic income (UBI), and public spending on education and health.

Progressive income taxes. Personal income tax progressivity has declined steeply in the s. The Impact of Tax and Expenditure Policies on Income Distribution 3 been attributed to fiscal policies in developing countries, such in the cases of Indonesia (Keuning and Thorbecke, ) or Latin America (Ocampo, ).

On the other hand, some other authors have found a weak correlation between changes in government spending and income inequality. The current situation shows that low-income countries typically collect taxes of between percent of GDP, while the average for high-income countries is more like 40 percent.

Clearly there needs to be an organised effort to help developing countries increase their tax revenue to match a similar level as developed nations.Income distribution policy in developing countries: a case study of Korea (English) Abstract. The authors have developed a dynamic computable general equilibrium model that provides a laboratory for investigating the potential impact of various policy instruments and programs intended to improve the relative and absolute incomes of the poor.

The.Keywords: taxpolicy,taxadministration,tax reform, developing countries, fiscal policy 1. The Centrality of Taxation to Economic Development and Poverty Reduction Awell-functioning revenue system is a neces-sary condition for strong, sustained and inclu-sive economic development.

Revenue funds the public expenditure on physical, social and.